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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
13:08 17.01.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> This is probably sarcasm
quoted1
It isn't. I really appreciate you spent your time making that post.

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> It is not «our officials» who made the Deal. The Deal was made by May and her advisors
quoted1
The only thing I didn't get is why you don't count May as one of your officials. As for me if she isn't one of your officials, who is?
May be you mean that only May and her team are mainly responsible for what has happened with Brexit?
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17264
13:15 17.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

> Sounds great to me
>
> Btw, what do you think about yellow vests in France? I'm mostly positive about them.
quoted1

I am positive about them as well. According to the polls, 73% to 84% of the French population support their movement. This is a grassroots movement for economic justice both for the working and the middle classes. You see — in Europe and the UK there 's been a widespread policy of austerity — squeeze on people's pay, higher taxes, etc. Here it has been pretty much the same. It is just here at the moment it is the Brexit palaver that takes away a lot of attention from the social issues, but things are not that great either.

To be honest, and this is my opinion which is based on my whole life span here — the quality of life has been going down over the years in general. I even think that people here generally used to live better during the times of the USSR. I mean -there was a lot of anti Soviet propaganda and there was the Cold War of course and all that, what I mean is this: there was some kind of a socialist State in the world, another model, and here in the West — the rich and the establishment had to try harder to be nicer to the working and middle classes, as were scared that otherwise it would end up like in the USSR.

Here in the UK a family used to be able to buy a nice three bedroom terraced house in the 1990s for £60,000 pounds (I am talking London), now you can't buy a one bed flat for less than £350,000 (in the area we live in). The salaries have not gone up that much since then. So young people have no hope of buying anything. They call the Brits now — «generation rent». The rents are so high, people can't save up for a deposit to buy anything. Everything is a lot harder. And they keep «bussing in» (bringing in by bus — this is just a slang expression) — cheap workforce from all over the place — to keep workforce cheaper and salaries down. So the rich are getting richer and the poorer are getting poorer.

That is partially why a lot of working class people voted for Brexit. I mean — it was not just the working class who voted to leave the EU — some people voted really cause they see it as an undemocratic organization, but there was this anti establishment element in the Brexit vote as well.

The connection between ordinary people and the establishment has been eroded over the years — not just in France, here it is the same story.

It is all coming back now — from the bottom upwards — demonstrations, union strikes, people voting for anti Establishment parties, etc. And it is gonna grow in my view until things get better.

A lot of people here see uncontrolled immigration as one of the major problems. One of the things that the Tories are trying to achieve with Brexit (and May's Deal was kind of promising that) — is the end to the freedom of movement. But then you can't be part of the Customs Union, etc.

These days a lot of Brits are emigrating themselves — primarily to Canada and Australia, where the standard of living is now generally better than in the UK — it is cheaper, in Australia there is less immigration, cause the immigration system is tougher, etc. Who would have thought that people here would dream of leaving the country and emigrating to former colonies and dominions? It is just shameful.

A lot of people blame the EU for it. It was supposed to bring everyone more prosperity, but it didn't quite do that at all. I don't know really, but somehow there is a lot more poverty around — especially in the Mediterranean countries.

This yellow vest movement is getting somewhere, cause it is on quite a big scale and the Establishment will have to listen.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 17264
13:26 17.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

>
>
>
quoted1
Everyone is blaming May for everything at the moment, yeah, she is one of our officials I guess. But if you think about it — the vote was close (it was 52% V 48%), she has been trying to appease both sides really and failed miserably. Now no one knows what will happen next. People here always vent their frustrations at whoever is in charge. And people are definitely frustrated and unhappy with how the Brexit process has been handled. The truth is May is one of the Establishment people and she probably has been trying to do more of «damage limitation» for the Establishment rather than trying to deliver on the public vote. Now we are caught up in this Brexit deadlock. The General Election is not gonna solve the issue, I don't think. It is just gonna add more chaos, etc.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 17264
13:35 17.01.2019
This is a good piece of analysis from the BBC as to what happens next

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46393399
Liked: Grin
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
13:36 17.01.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
>> The only thing I didn't get is why you don't count May as one of your officials. As for me if she isn't one of your officials, who is? May be you mean that only May and her team are mainly responsible for what has happened with Brexit?
quoted2
>
>>
>>
>>
quoted2
>Everyone is blaming May for everything at the moment, yeah, she is one of our officials I guess. But if you think about it — the vote was close (it was 52% V 48%), she has been trying to appease both sides really and failed miserably. Now no one knows what will happen next. People here always vent their frustrations at whoever is in charge. And people are definitely frustrated and unhappy with how the Brexit process has been handled. The truth is May is one of the Establishment people and she probably has been trying to do more of «damage limitation» for the Establishment rather than trying to deliver on the public vote. Now we are caught up in this Brexit deadlock. The General Election is not gonna solve the issue, I don't think. It is just gonna add more chaos, etc.
quoted1
Yep, it looks like epic fail for May. I still think «no deal» is unlikely to happen. Do I get it right that no deal will be also an epic fail not only for May, but for EU officials too?
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
13:43 17.01.2019
gtg now, see you
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  Redhead
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Messages: 17264
13:47 17.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
>> Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
>>> The only thing I didn't get is why you don't count May as one of your officials. As for me if she isn't one of your officials, who is? May be you mean that only May and her team are mainly responsible for what has happened with Brexit?
quoted3
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
quoted3
>>Everyone is blaming May for everything at the moment, yeah, she is one of our officials I guess. But if you think about it — the vote was close (it was 52% V 48%), she has been trying to appease both sides really and failed miserably. Now no one knows what will happen next. People here always vent their frustrations at whoever is in charge. And people are definitely frustrated and unhappy with how the Brexit process has been handled. The truth is May is one of the Establishment people and she probably has been trying to do more of «damage limitation» for the Establishment rather than trying to deliver on the public vote. Now we are caught up in this Brexit deadlock. The General Election is not gonna solve the issue, I don't think. It is just gonna add more chaos, etc.
quoted2
>Yep, it looks like epic fail for May. I still think «no deal» is unlikely to happen. Do I get it right that no deal will be also an epic fail not only for May, but for EU officials too?
quoted1

Everyone says different things here, I don't really know who to believe anymore. Some say that «No deal» will be disastrous in the short term — there will be queues at the sea ports and airports, chaos, etc. No proper preparations for the «No Deal» scenario have been made. But no one is prepared to accept a bad deal either. Likewise, the Establishment is too scared to cancel Brexit as well, as then it will be seen as the betrayal of democracy. I reckon they will put the whole thing on hold and continue to negotiate something better. There have been noises coming from the EU officials that they are prepared to extend the Article 50 until summer. Don't know what's gonna happen after that. The country that will be most affected by the No Deal will be Ireland, they say their GDP growth will be down by 4% to 7% in the event of the No deal, as most of their trade is with the UK. But everyone will be adversely affected — both us and the EU.
It is all a bit depressing to be honest.
I got to go now, speak later.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17264
21:39 17.01.2019
The circus continues. May is supposed to have cross party consultations with all the MPs on how best to deliver Brexit in such a short space of time left, but Corbyn ordered Labour not to take part in it, cause now May refused to rule out the No Deal (she used to do it before, now it is like her Eurosceptic wing won). He wrote her a letter saying that Labour refuse to take part in the crucial talks unless she rules out the No Deal. She wrote him a letter back saying that she cannot do that, it is impossible. It is like a kindergarten — all this letter exchange between them.

Straight after the vote on the 15th the Tory Brexiteers who all voted against May's deal and therefore blocked it — were celebrating with glasses of Champaign in Jacob Rees Mogg's London house. They are definitely kind of serious about the No Deal now. This is the interview he gave to the BBC on the 16th — explaining why they blocked the deal and why they backed May in No Confidence vote.

Andrew Neil grills Jacob Rees Mogg on Brexit (16Jan19)



Rees Mogg is a very smart guy and he has such a perfect poker face, you just don't know — whether they are serious or whether it is a stance for the sake of the EU. I think they are actually serious about the No deal. Today Phillip Hammond (he is the Chancellor of the Exchequer  — that is like your Finance Minister — a number 2 person after May in the Cabinet and a bit of a Remainer) was caught suggesting that the Government might rule out the No deal within weeks to reassure 330 business leaders, and the other Tories came down on him like a ton of bricks, called him «a rogue element» and all that. So I think the No deal is quite possible and is firmly on the table, which is scary.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/01/17/...
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  Redhead
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Messages: 17264
22:51 17.01.2019
P. S. This is what Farage thinks about all this, he is very happy that the Brexiteers blocked May's deal, but wants her gone

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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
16:00 18.01.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> This is what Farage thinks about all this, he is very happy that the Brexiteers blocked May's deal, but wants her gone
quoted1
I think EU will extend the Article 50 until summer if necessary. No deal will hurt them too, not only economically, some reputational losses are also possible.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17264
20:56 18.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
>> This is what Farage thinks about all this, he is very happy that the Brexiteers blocked May's deal, but wants her gone
quoted2
>I think EU will extend the Article 50 until summer if necessary. No deal will hurt them too, not only economically, some reputational losses are also possible.
quoted1

That's what a lot of people are saying here. But it is not gonna solve anything. The main selling points of Leaving were: 1) End to the freedom of movement with the EU, 2) the ability to sign our own free trade deals with other countries, which we cannot do as an EU member or even a Customs Union member. To achieve both these things — a clean break from the EU is required, people like Rees Mogg and Farage are right. And the Parliament and May's Government are not prepared to do it. So we are just gonna go round and round in circles, like idiots. With nothing at the end of it. We don't have people who are courageous enough and bold enough at the wheel of the ship at the moment, we have people like May and those on her Government payroll, who are gonna mess everyone about. It is clear as day. They are just gonna keep inventing one reason after another — why this can't be done or that can't be done, making sure that the public are so sick of this Brexit getting on everyone's nerves (a lot already are), that in case of the Second Referendum everyone will just vote «Yes» - out of sheer exhaustion, just to end it all. If that happens, I will take back my words that this country is the most democratic in the world. Honestly.

What befuddles me — why on Earth did the Tories start all this with the Referendum in the first place? Probably just so that Cameron could lead the Tories to power with no coalition in 2015 for the first time since John Major (this promise got him and his party clean victory for the first time in 18 years at the time). And then he just had to go ahead with the Referendum, if he didn't carry out his promise - no one would have ever voted for the Tories again. Each time he comes on the telly now — he always says one and the same thing «I don't regret having called the Referendum», like he feels guilty about it and has to defend himself. It is pathetic.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
18:11 21.01.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> What befuddles me — why on Earth did the Tories start all this with the Referendum in the first place?
quoted1
Probably, he was sure people won't vote for Brexit.

I've completely forgot about European figure skating championship. It will take place on 23−27 January 2019 in Minsk.

Here is the timetable
http://speedskating.ru/novosti-figurnogo-katani...

Can't wait to see Alena, Alexandra and Anna (so called AAA) in seniors. There are rumors there will be a second attempt to raise the bar of turning senior up to 18 years. If ISU changes the rules this year and they have to stay in juniors for 3 more seasons I will be outraged. No one can call Alena's skating juniorish, it will be so unfair if ISU keeps them away from senior podiums (and sponsors). Russian ladies are strongest in the world, and AAA easily won over Zagitova, Medvedeva and other Russian top ladies at Russian Nationals 2019. Let the strongest skaters take their rightful place!
ISU officials whining all the time that figure skating needs more fans. Skaters like Kostornaya can bring more fans to the sport. Raising the bar of turning senior for ladies is kinda shooting your own leg for ISU, but I'm afraid they will go for it.


Skaters like Kostornaya - definitely very special and can bring more fans to the sport. Why can't the Russians make them senior before the new law kicks in ? I thought that is what they were planning to do anyway.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7412
21:01 21.01.2019
About upcoming Ukrainian presidential elections
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17264
21:15 21.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Probably, he was sure people won't vote for Brexit.
>
quoted1
He couldn't have been sure of that,. Why would people want the vote if they were happy with how things were and had no intention of leaving? I think he was just sure he could get the necessary concessions from the EU on the freedom of movement issue prior to the vote and he didn't.
May didn't get any concessions either — well, she got more than he did — the end to the freedom of movement IS in her deal, but no one wants it with the Irish backstop in the deal. The sad thing about it is this. I actually meet a lot of Europeans working here on a regular basis — nice people, talented people, who definitely bring skills and knowledge and competitive edge to this country (take my youngest son's Italian best mate and his family for instance — Mom has 5 beauty salons in the UK, she is working her guts out, not a parasite or whatever, they have never claimed any benefits here) and a lot of them right now feel a bit sad and put out (slang — unhappy, offended) and ask questions like «Why do they not want us?», etc. That is not the issue however. People just want the immigration planned and controlled in a reasonable way. People like my son's friend's family would be OK in any situation. But still — it is all quite sad.
May thinks it is still worth building on her deal — and she can go back to Brussels, saying to them :"look, this has been strongly rejected by the Parliament, «there will have to be further concessions or we will all find ourselves in the most messy scenario, which all of us will suffer from — both economically and politically». I am quite pessimistic though on the issue of her achieving any progress with Brussels, she is just not the right person to do it now. The person in charge now should be a Hard Brexiteer. Another issue of course — is the Parliament are mostly Remainers. So she has pressures from both sides — Parliament trying to dilute Brexit as much as possible, and her own Tory back benchers rejecting anything that is not proper Brexit according to them.

Rees Mogg now says that No deal is the most likely scenario. And the Government is even suggesting dragging the QUeen into this mess https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/01/21/... (Bercow is the Speaker and is biased heavily on the Remainers' side, he should be neutral by all accounts, but he is not). If this happens — this will be the first Monarch to interfere with the Parliamentary process since 1707. It is getting that crazy.

I am surprised Boris Johnson still thinks May can go back to Brussels and strike a deal, I don't think she can. He thinks it is worth another go



But here we already have things like this popping up on the political programmes more and more, trying to prepare people for a No deal scenario



By the way, Farage is making a return to politics (he didn't quit it as such, he just quit UKIP, cause UKIP accepted Tommy Robinson — considered a very far right character,) Now he is forming a new Party to fight for the proper Brexit.




It doesn't matter how sick of all this Brexit talk people are — it is everywhere and there is no escaping it.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 17264
21:22 21.01.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

>
>
> Skaters like Kostornaya — definitely very special and can bring more fans to the sport. Why can't the Russians make them senior before the new law kicks in? I thought that is what they were planning to do anyway.quoted1
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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2. It isn't. I really appreciate you spent your time making that post. The only thing I ...
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