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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
20:49 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> Do you think that somebody will listen to a band from a poor East European country (also known as 'Soviet Russia' in the West) even if they will sing in English? Not sure enough. And point at anyone from American-English stage who will give ability to some perspective singer to raise popularity.
>
quoted1

Of course people will listen to singers from the «Soviet Russia» if they sing in English. I can think of a couple of examples — straight off the bat, as they say.

Tatoo — the Russian group — made the charts here, were popular, sold tons of records in the UK. People loved their stuff, found it «cute», they had gigs with full audiences here. I don't think they had British producers.



Dua Lipa — who is massive here- is a daughter of a Kosovo Albanian refugee. She is raking it in (that's idiom for «making a lot of money»).

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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
20:55 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> Pardon me, but I don't even want to discuss this chauvinistic nonsense.
>
quoted1
It ain't chauvinistic in the slightest, mate. It's the world we live in. Whether you like it or not.

Here — from the British Council

Is English the official language of music?





Each May since 1956 people from across Europe and around the world have gathered around their televisions with friends and family for an extended evening of international entertainment: The Eurovision Song Contest. For one night every year our continent, rich with languages and cultures, is united by music. With up to 27 finalists and 200 million viewers, the competition may well be a fun event but perhaps it’s not the shared celebration of European language and cultural diversity that it could be. In the first ten years of Eurovision, the UK and Ireland were the only two countries to sing in English. Now English is what we expect. Is it that English is becoming, or has become the official language of music?

From high streets in Hungary to supermarkets in Sweden, from bus stops in Bulgaria to parks in Poland, people listen to English-language music everywhere. And people don’t just listen, they sing it too! From sporting events in Spain to nightclubs in Norway, from concerts in Croatia to fitness classes in France, people sing along to popular songs in their everyday lives, in English. But why?

For one evening each year Eurovision is the dinner party of Europe. A dinner party to which each guest brings something unique. Their clothing, customs and cuisine represent their culture and their language represents the unique character of a nation. Although there are 50 nations with 83 languages — official, regional, and minority — for Eurovision, English dominates completely. Does Eurovision really showcase Europe?

English is an international language spoken by over 1 billion people worldwide. It is no surprise therefore that so many musicians make music in English. Of course, music makes money and more listeners make more money. Then again, perhaps English simply sounds better. According to Ragnar Thorhallsson, singer and guitarist with the Icelandic indie band ‘Of Monsters and Men', his language is harsh. He thinks that English is simpler and is easier to make rhymes.


P. S. Do you have musical education? Any musician would tell you that English is much more flexible than other languages to accommodate a variety of rhythms. That is not to say that any other country's music is shit, I am talking about going global here, do you get it?
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
21:10 29.09.2018
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> It can be annoying sometimes, I usually try to sneak away quietly if I feel too tired or don't like the party.
>
quoted1

Here you can't do that. The culture in Britain is the drinking culture, pub culture. People go out for drinks a lot. If you don't go out with your workmates, friends etc — your behaviour is considered a bit anti social — people see you as a spoil sport, etc. If one is a tea totaller (this is what they call people who don't drink at all and go to bed at 9 o'clock) — they will see you as boring or an alcoholic. But even alcoholics go to pubs along with others, they just drink soft drinks, that's it. Here it is all about the art of drinking, handling your drink, which sometimes can be harder than not drinking at all cause as soon as you have one drink - your inhibitions kind of go away a little bit . But if you can't drink sensibly — you are effed. You can then become an alcoholic, etc. I can drink sensibly, I am just a lightweight in terms of drinking. 3 pints a night is my limit. Anything above that — and I am smashed. So — what I usually do — is sip my pint very slowly and have a pint of mineral water with lime and soda in between the lager pints. That keeps one hydrated as well. So — no hangover in the morning. It is just now and again — I do get pissed, royally pissed. Here they call it «letting your hair down». As long as you do it only now and again and most importantly — with people you know and trust — people who you know for a fact won't take advantage of you or anything like that, or people you can face in the morning at work after making a drunken fool out of yourself the night before — you are OK. My mates at work are like that. We all made fools out of ourselves at one point or other in the past and we trust one another, etc. For those who are top managers, etc. — it is harder, but even they go to the pub with everyone and drink, Finance Directors, CEOs, you name it.

But to tell you the truth — the best country — the most civilized country in terms of the drinking culture is actually France. In France — they give wine to kids. If you are in some cafe in Paris (they have cafe culture rather than pub culture there, but they serve wine in cafes) — it is not unusual to see a nice family with little kids — 5 or 6 year olds — drinking wine with their parents, but the kids' wine portions are mixed with a lot of water. But they get used to the taste and when they grow up they can handle drink very well. Actually — they don't have chavs throwing up in the streets from getting pissed like we do in the UK and they have the lowest heart attack rates in Europe. But they do drink a lot of wine. Go figure.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
21:49 29.09.2018
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

>
>
> My opinion — it is typical for Alina «I'm so busy doing transitions» type of program. People also call it points grabbing type of program. Not a masterpiece, but it allows her to get huge scores.
quoted1

I must admit — she is actually fantastic. They mentioned her here on BBC today a lot — she set a new world record or something.
But the little one — Kostornaya — is going to be even better, isn't that great? She just has better looks and personality, her looks are international, kind of classically beautiful - I mean Kostornaya — just gorgeous. You have a lot of great figure skaters, that's fantastic, isn't it just?
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12187
22:28 29.09.2018
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> The English you call «authentic» is RP — received pronunciation. This is usually how TV presenters speak, etc.
quoted1
If you mean the last (TV presenters), that is not what I mean. I mean something like this:

For example it is very hard for me to understand language of Terry Gilliam's heroes in his Brazil. Just a perfect example are Doctor Who TV series. In one episode 11-th Doctor came to New York in 20-s and I could hear strikingly difference between American and British English: I was able only to understand Americans without subtitles. For me is clearer language of an Afro-American Samuel Jackson than fellows from Monty Python troop.

Though it varies from tempo and diction a lot.


Also, I understood more Cockney English than other accents in the video. And please tell me why there are so much accents in such a tiny country? About Cornwell, Wales, Scotland it's understood, but inside England itself… In Ukraine for example even 100 years ago it didn't differ so much between Dnipro-Land (Наддніпрянщина) and Halychyna.
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12187
22:38 29.09.2018
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Ariana Grande is there for the teens, all the young girls turning teenagers want to look like her, sound like her and behave like her, etc.
quoted1
And (please excuse my language) caress vagina like Nicki Minaj or shoot lazers from boobs (Side to Side and Break Free respectively). It's disgusting for me. Don't know, what do people like in it.
> As they say in England — «you gotta love the teenager in you».
quoted1
For some things this age ought to be loathed.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
22:40 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

> For example it is very hard for me to understand language of Terry Gilliam's heroes in his Brazil. Just a perfect example are Doctor Who TV series. In one episode 11-th Doctor came to New York in 20-s and I could hear strikingly difference between American and British English: I was able only to understand Americans without subtitles. For me is clearer language of an Afro-American Samuel Jackson than fellows from Monty Python troop.
>
> Though it varies from tempo and diction a lot.
quoted1

You watch Monty Python? I must admit — I am gobsmacked. ~Monty Python is one of the best pure English comedy examples ever. Have you heard of Blackadder? That's another classic series.

This is with Hugh Laurie playing the Prince of Wales and Blackadder — a little episode (Rowan Atkinson, known to the Russians and Ukrainians mostly from his Mr Bean series)





P. S. Queen's English is considered to be the best English here of course. It is better than RP (RP is not natural at all," manufactured" if you like) — Received pronunciation was introduced when the TV era began — just so that no accent in England and Wales and Scotland and Ireland is «put down» for not being selected to be used for the telly news, in reality everyone here knows and understands and can speak and imitate all the accents of the land, even I can do it to be honest — the English have taught me that.
Queen's English is the best of the best of course

Queen as a kid — addressing the little kids who came to the Commonwealth Countries (from Nazi camps, etc) who were separated from their families during World War 2
Princess Elizabeth Broadcasts To The Nation on Children's Hour (1940) | War Archives

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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16276
23:09 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> And please tell me why there are so much accents in such a tiny country?
quoted1

Because the culture is different. It is a culture of an individual here. Me, my house, my money, mine — that's it. I speak the way I wanna speak. It is not the culture of the crowd. For the culture of the crowd to prevail — that has to be imposed from the top you see, in the UK it is much harder to do — simply because of the mentality. Here — historically — communities were formed on the principles of goodwill and goodwill only — deep down, otherwise they didn't last long. That is why they call the Brits — the most proud nation of the world — some call it snobbish, but it is not. But you have to live here for a long time in the community to understand the concept, where it comes from, etc. That is why something like Magna Carta could only be born here (at the time I mean).
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12187
23:10 29.09.2018
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Tatoo — the Russian group — made the charts here, were popular, sold tons of records in the UK. People loved their stuff, found it «cute», they had gigs with full audiences here. I don't think they had British producers
quoted1
Please tell me, how much people you can recall who sings English and got popular? I can remember only Rihanna (though in Jamaica people speak English) and Shakira from South America. All others are English and American. What profit will earn Ukrainian band singing in English if it can get 200 million views for a Russian language song? Their auditory may just be more dispersed, but not much popular.

> English is an international language spoken by over 1 billion people worldwide. It is no surprise therefore that so many musicians make music in English. Of course, music makes money and more listeners make more money. Then again, perhaps English simply sounds better. According to Ragnar Thorhallsson, singer and guitarist with the Icelandic indie band ‘Of Monsters and Men', his language is harsh. He thinks that English is simpler and is easier to make rhymes.
> P. S. Do you have musical education? Any musician would tell you that English is much more flexible than other languages to accommodate a variety of rhythms. That is not to say that any other country's music is shit, I am talking about going global here, do you get it?
quoted1
Sounding better and having ability of less complicated rhymes making is not the same. First is aesthetic feature and second is rational. And I understood is as better aesthetically.

If that assumption is right, why did not English dominate in prewar Europe? In my opinion all European countries then were self-sufficient, especially before the Great War. But after WW2 all spheres of man's life became subordinated to the American way. All technical and cultural progress begins in the United States of America. From there are atomic weapons, Abramses, Windowses and iPhones, but not from France, Korea or Germany. They make 4-th part of world economy, so why do we need to learn French language, when you can earn more with English, which is the only understood language in the citadel of democracy?

English was needed to survive in the Cold War world. And when much people learnt it, they began to think, where it can be also used except in aiding US army to strike soviet positions in the WW3. That's what I think.

For example, see how much views do have singers who sing in French.
> ********* (expand)

Or those who sing in Spanish:
> ********* (expand)

If France had colonised India, there would have been billion views.
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12187
23:14 29.09.2018
Redhead (Expat), I will answer you tomorrow. It's hard for me to write in English. So sweet dreams!
Liked: Redhead
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16276
23:18 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> ⍟ Redhead (Expat), I will answer you tomorrow. It's hard for me to write in English. So sweet dreams!
>
quoted1
Sweet dreams)

Glory to Ukraine! (I love Ukraine to be honest, my best childhood memories are from staying at my grandmother's in Ukraine - the best people and the most finger licking food EVER)

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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
23:35 29.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> Sounding better and having ability of less complicated rhymes making is not the same. First is aesthetic feature and second is rational. And I understood is as better aesthetically.
quoted1

You don't have musical education. English is better than any other both aesthetically and rationally (rationally — from the point of view of the English language already being the international language.)
Aesthetically — as well. What’s so special about English?
By comparison with many other languages, for songwriting English is a breeze. Lots of opportunities for rhyming lyrics, nice short words that mean a lot so you can relax the musical pace as you please, pronunciation that doesn’t require you to contort your mouth and tongue so your face looks like a tumble dryer at work, plus plenty of words ending in convenient vowel sounds that are easily «singable,» as Jacqui Dankworth described. Those who write (music, poetry and everything else) in English are very lucky to use a language that is so flexible and obliging
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> For example, see how much views do have singers who sing in French.
>> ********* (expand)
quoted2
>
> Or those who sing in Spanish:
>> ********* (expand)
quoted2
quoted1
Iglesias realeases his every single not only in Spanish, but in English as well.


Very very few singles in other languages get billion views and if they do — they get an English cover as a must. So — no go as an argument to counter mine.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
00:04 30.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> Please tell me, how much people you can recall who sings English and got popular? I can remember only Rihanna
quoted1

Really? What about the Swedish Zara Larrson that you cited here as an example of great pop music? This is the list of multilingual bands and artists that produced tracks selling around the world — everyone of them sang in English as well as their native language https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_multilingu...

Every one of them!!!! What other proof do you want?
It is much easier to single out those who are popular without singing in English. Noone like that comes to my mind at the moment.

Re Rihanna — the whole of the Caribbean — including Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda (of which Queen Elizabeth is still Head of State), Barbados, St Lucia, Belize — English is no 1 official state language. No 1.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
00:08 30.09.2018
Guys — my girl — my daughter got the result from the LAMDA (London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts) exam today (standing up poetry — that's a starting level that she did this summer, she is doing the LAMDA first level acting exam later this term in her Drama School) and to get Distinction one had to get 80 points. She got 88 (!!!!!). We just got the text from the Drama Teacher. They are going to give out the Certificates later this term. I am so proud. I will post the picture of her Certificate here when she gets it. I am on top of the world

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  Redhead
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Messages: 16276
10:32 30.09.2018
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> And (please excuse my language) caress vagina like Nicki Minaj or shoot lazers from boobs (Side to Side and Break Free respectively). It's disgusting for me. Don't know, what do people like in it.
>
quoted1
I missed this post of yours earlier.

Nicki Menaj is not music and not viewed as such by most — it is the most low level trash one can imagine, but then again — she also has a market — she sells something and earns out of it, doesn't she? One doesn't have to love absolutely everything that comes out in music in English. There will be creme de la creme, very good stuff, decent stuff, OK stuff, teenage stuff and lowlives like Menaj. Take your pick, as they say. The choice is yours. The good thing about it is there is a choice.
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> For some things this age ought to be loathed.
quoted1

>

Nothing like that should be loathed. You gotta love the kid in you, teenager in you, the young, the old, the wise and not — etc.

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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2. Of course people will listen to singers from the «Soviet Russia» if they sing in English. I can ...
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