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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
18:06 16.05.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> the principal will get her an automatic Pass for Standard 3 with ISTD
quoted1
Sounds like good news in the current circumstances

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> she will gradually change into ballet shoes and then on pointe shoes
quoted1
Do they always train on pointe (if healthy)?
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
18:11 16.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Do they always train on pointe (if healthy)?
quoted1
On pointe training only started a year ago, prior to Standard 2 — there was no on pointe. Now yes — they do some on pointe work at every class pretty much.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
20:59 16.05.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
>> Do they always train on pointe (if healthy)?
quoted2
>On pointe training only started a year ago, prior to Standard 2 — there was no on pointe. Now yes — they do some on pointe work at every class pretty much.
quoted1
I heard it isn't healthy to train on pointe too much. I hope they switch to more comfortable shoes from time to time
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
21:04 16.05.2019
Ahahaha




Yandex tranlslate
I use it as a spell checker from time to time
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
21:56 16.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
>> Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
>>> Do they always train on pointe (if healthy)?
quoted3
>>On pointe training only started a year ago, prior to Standard 2 — there was no on pointe. Now yes — they do some on pointe work at every class pretty much.
quoted2
>I heard it isn't healthy to train on pointe too much. I hope they switch to more comfortable shoes from time to time
quoted1
They do both, most of the training is done wearing ordinary ballet shoes. Some stuff they do in ballet is not particularly healthy, but what ballet is good for is your body core muscles, as well as elasticity, flexibility. But it is not particularly good for one’s feet.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
22:01 16.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

>
> Yandex tranlslate
> I use it as a spell checker from time to time
quoted1
Technically speaking, «on pointe» is wrong. One should either say «en pointe» (French) or «on point» (English). «On pointe» is a hybrid of the two, I made a mistake. I am not perfect after all (I am just joking, of course I am perfect )
Liked: Grin
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
15:15 18.05.2019

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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
20:19 18.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:

It is funny how many people all over the world learn English and speak English, but at the same time — they don't speak proper English and can't really properly understand Brits or Americans.

There was this article on the BBC Business on the subject, it is quite funny — about business meetings in various multinationals and banks, obviously always held in English :


Native English speakers are the world's worst communicators


In a room full of non-native speakers, ‘there isn’t any chance of understanding'. It might be their language, but the message is often lost.

It was just one word in one email, but it triggered huge financial losses for a multinational company.
The message, written in English, was sent by a native speaker to a colleague for whom English was a second language. Unsure of the word, the recipient found two contradictory meanings in his dictionary. He acted on the wrong one.
Months later, senior management investigated why the project had flopped, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars. «It all traced back to this one word,» says Chia Suan Chong, a UK-based communications skills and intercultural trainer, who didn't reveal the tricky word because it is highly industry-specific and possibly identifiable. «Things spiralled out of control because both parties were thinking the opposite.»

When such misunderstandings happen, it’s usually the native speakers who are to blame. Ironically, they are worse at delivering their message than people who speak English as a second or third language, according to Chong.
«A lot of native speakers are happy that English has become the world’s global language. They feel they don’t have to spend time learning another language,» says Chong. «But… often you have a boardroom full of people from different countries communicating in English and all understanding each other and then suddenly the Brit or American walks into the room and nobody can understand them.»

The non-native speakers, it turns out, speak more purposefully and carefully, typical of someone speaking a second or third language. Anglophones, on the other hand, often talk too fast for others to follow, and use jokes, slang and references specific to their own culture, says Chong. In emails, they use baffling abbreviations such as ‘OOO', instead of simply saying that they will be out of the office.
«The native English speaker… is the only one who might not feel the need to accommodate or adapt to the others,» she adds.

Typically, native English speakers dominate meetings about 90% of the time — Michael Blattner

Relating to your audience

With non-native English speakers in the majority worldwide, it’s Anglophones who may need to up their game.

«Native speakers are at a disadvantage when you are in a lingua franca situation,» where English is being used as a common denominator, says Jennifer Jenkins, professor of global Englishes at the UK’s University of Southampton. «It's the native English speakers that are having difficulty understanding and making themselves understood.»
Non-native speakers generally use more limited vocabulary and simpler expressions, without flowery language or slang. Because of that, they understand one another at face value. Jenkins found, for instance, that international students at a British university understood each other well in English and swiftly adapted to helping the least fluent members in any group.

Giving others a chance
When trying to communicate in English with a group of people with varying levels of fluency, it’s important to be receptive and adaptable, tuning your ears into a whole range of different ways of using English, Jenkins says.
«People who’ve learned other languages are good at doing that, but native speakers of English generally are monolingual and not very good at tuning in to language variation,» she says.
In meetings, Anglophones tend to speed along at what they consider a normal pace, and also rush to fill gaps in conversation, according to Steggles.
«It could be that the non-native speaker is trying to formulate a sentence,» he says. «You just have to wait a heartbeat and give them a chance. Otherwise, after the meeting they come up and say, ‘What was all that about?' Or they walk away and nothing happens because they haven’t understood.»
He recommends making the same point in a couple of different ways and asking for some acknowledgement, reaction or action.
«If there’s no participation,» Steggles cautions, «you don’t know whether you’ve been understood or not.»
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
20:28 18.05.2019
Thing is — it is not just the accent differences, it is the way the non natives build their sentences, their vocabulary, expressions. A lot of the times they translate everything in their head word for word from their mother tongue into English and then blurt it out. For a native, it can be hard to understand what the hell they are on about. But I guess these days the Brits are better at doing that than anyone else cause they have been having a lot of practice with nearly every dog speaking their language — wherever they go in the world and they travel a hell of a lot and are exposed to all sorts or immigration.

Here they give people tutorials and stuff on how to understand non native English speakers better, similar to that article — especially to those who work in the City or multinational financial organisations — to avoid blunders.

Funnily enough, when we just came over here from Moscow and I used to have quite a strong Russian accent, people used to ask me a lot, at school, at the Uni, everywhere «Where are you from, Redhead?» And I would say in a very quiet and shy manner, almost blushing «I am from Russia». They would say «That's great, what a lovely accent. Don't lose it». And I would say «Why?» And I remember lots of people saying «Cause the worst thing for an Englishman is to be in the room full of the English only». I would ask «Why?» And the answer was «Because it is bloody boring». And that helped me not to be ashamed of my accent at the time. Sometimes I feel bad that I kind of lost that accent along the way. Like I lost something precious you know.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
20:49 18.05.2019
Our polling cards arrived last week to go and vote in the European elections next Thursday, which is ridiculous after almost 3 years (!!!!!) ago people voted to get out of the EU.






Back of the cards


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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
21:03 18.05.2019
At the moment Tories are 5th in the polls for this election predictions. In the local council elections in the beginning of May — there was a Tory blood bath — they lost over 1,300 councils across the country (the worst case scenario of 600 Council seats' losses had been predicted before the actual vote took place) — the worst result in the history of the Party. Some people who went to vote spoilt their voting papers by crossing everything and writing «Brexit» on it. The Farage's Brexit Party is expected to win this election, even though he only just formed the Party. The Remain vote is split — there are Lib Dems who are all Remainers, some Labour (not all of them) and Change UK — also a new party just formed to oppose the Brexit Party. Change UK consists of the Remainers from both the Tory Party and the Labour Party. But they are not that popular and the name is a bit stupid «Change UK», as they are essentially advocating the status quo — the UK staying in the EU as is. I actually think that this is the best option — if compared to May's awful deal that is. It is all a bit depressing. That is why I stopped talking about it, I probably am not even gonna bother to vote, hubby will vote for the Tories as usual regardless.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
21:55 18.05.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Sometimes I feel bad that I kind of lost that accent along the way. Like I lost something precious you know.
quoted1
Well, you can go to Moscow or St. Peresburg for 2 weeks and it will return))

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Our polling cards arrived last week to go and vote in the European elections next Thursday, which is ridiculous after almost 3 years (!!!!!) ago people voted to get out of the EU.
quoted1
It is ridiculus. I bet people in Britain will vote for eurosceptics.

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Some people who went to vote spoilt their voting papers by crossing everything and writing «Brexit» on it. The Farage's Brexit Party is expected to win this election, even though he only just formed the Party. The Remain vote is split — there are Lib Dems who are all Remainers, some Labour (not all of them) and Change UK — also a new party just formed to oppose the Brexit Party. Change UK consists of the Remainers from both the Tory Party and the Labour Party. But they are not that popular and the name is a bit stupid «Change UK», as they are essentially advocating the status quo — the UK staying in the EU as is. I actually think that this is the best option — if compared to May's awful deal that is. It is all a bit depressing. That is why I stopped talking about it, I probably am not even gonna bother to vote, hubby will vote for the Tories as usual regardless.
quoted1
Oh, first I wrote about eurosceptics and then read you post about Farage. I think even if the UK will stay in the EU as is it won't last for long.
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  Redhead
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Messages: 16699
22:11 18.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Well, you can go to Moscow or St. Peresburg for 2 weeks and it will return))
quoted1

It won't, not for long. Last time it returned — me and my now husband (although I was married to my first one during those days, he didn't give me divorce for 6 years, even after everything that happened — it is a long story), we went for almost 3 weeks to see my relatives in Moscow and it did return, although I don't know whether they were complimenting me on it returning or whether it was genuine. Thing is — this was 2003 Christmas time/New Year — now we are in 2019. All the Russians here in Londongrad (as they call it) — tell me I lost it, that I am too English now. But to be honest — I am who I am. What I concluded by being on this forum — it is much much nicer to be a bit Russian amongst the English than a bit English amongst the Russians. That is for sure.
In any case, I am trying to plan my trip to Russia later this year — to Moscow for sure, to see my relatives. All of us definitely won't be able to go, as my oldest son won't be able to travel at the same time as my youngest two, it is a long story and my mother in law is in a vulnerable situation (it is touch and go at the moment, we don't know anything yet) — so my husband will be reluctant to go, but I will go probably with Vicky and Daniel, even if it is for a week. I really feel I need to go and see for myself what is happening there, what people are like, etc. I am yearning to go.
Liked: Grin
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16699
22:18 18.05.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Oh, first I wrote about eurosceptics and then read you post about Farage. I think even if the UK will stay in the EU as is it won't last for long.
quoted1

Ideally — they didn't want us to stay in the EU like this — in limbo (cause we are keeping everyone else in limbo as well — with this Brexit uncertainty) and for our Eurosceptic Parties to continue to undermine things for their integrators from within. This scenario is not what they (the EU) wanted. They offered us the dog's dinner type of deal (they on their part — had no choice but do this, as otherwise every other sane country would wanna leave this nightmare Union) that people here were wise enough not to accept, well — apart from the treacherous Theresa May, who is now on her way out. But she damaged the Tory Party badly in the process, their only hope now is Boris. Otherwise — it is «goodbye 2 party system» and here it will be havoc if the 2 Party system goes. It is difficult for me to explain, but the system here is very different from the European. Here it is FPTP — First Past the Post, the way it is organised. So — the fall of 2 Party system is as bad as a revolution or Maidan. Far Right will surge. The only hope was that the Tories — a moderate party will be able to harness the Brexit Crisis, May did everything she could to f uck it up further. We will see — that's all I can say.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7190
22:39 18.05.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Here it is FPTP — First Past the Post, the way it is organised. So — the fall of 2 Party system is as bad as a revolution or Maidan. Far Right will surge. The only hope was that the Tories — a moderate party will be able to harness the Brexit Crisis, May did everything she could to f uck it up further. We will see — that's all I can say.
quoted1
As for me your Far Right sound like centrists compared to Ukrainian Far Right. I don't know why you all so worried about right parties in Europe. Are there any grave consecuences if your Far Right parties will have a say in you foreign and domestic policy?
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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2. Sounds like good news in the current circumstancesDo they always train on pointe (if healthy)?
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