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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
11:20 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> I heard in Switzerland people often vote at referendums. What do you think about it?
quoted1
>

Yes, Switzerland is the only place on Earth where something called Direct Democracy actually exists in practice. Direct Democracy is the purest form of Democracy unlike Representative Democracy — which is what we have in Britain — Parliament, Government, etc. In Direct Democracy people directly decide all the major issues through public referendums. But even in Switzerland — it is not everywhere, but only in two provinces — the Swiss cantons of Appenzell Innerrhoden and Glarus.
So Switzerland as a country is considered a country of Semi Direct Democracy with strong elements of Direct Democracy.
But you have to bear in mind, that it is very hard to organize Direct Democracy in bigger countries, Switzerland is tiny — only 8 million people live there- less than in London or in Moscow. Can you imagine — organizing several referendums a year? I can't. Number one — to organize a proper Referendum — you need time, so that opposing sides can have proper campaigns trying to win a public vote. Over here — the Scottish Referendum took 2 years, Brexit — a bit less, but Brexit had been discussed here for donkey's years (a lot of years) — prior to the Referendum. You can't just ship some armed people in, put up a few posters about «banderovetz», take over some Government buildings and get it all done in two weeks — done and dusted. Like you did in Crimea. That is hardly a proper democratic process. Having said that, if a proper democratic process did take place in Crimea, people still might have voted to join Russia. That is why I think Putin did it all wrong. If a proper democratic process did take place, the West would have had to recognize it though. However, Ukraine might have never agreed to the Referendum being held there. Like Spain doesn't recognize any Catalonian Referendums. So it is not a very straightforward issue.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
11:41 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> That is why I think Putin did it all wrong. If a proper democratic process did take place, the West would have had to recognize it though. However, Ukraine might have never agreed to the Referendum being held there. Like Spain doesn't recognize any Catalonian Referendums. So it is not a very straightforward issue.
quoted1
I bet the West wouldn't recognize it anyway. As for me, western officials have double (or triple) standards when they deal with different countries.
And they don't bother themselves to act in full accordance with international laws when they deal with «3rd world countries». Ukrainian statehood suffered a lot at Maidan. Probably, Putin decided to act like that (green men, etc) after he saw that Ukrainian opposition backed by western leaders used Ukrainian constitution as a toilet paper.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
11:44 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Yes, Switzerland is the only place on Earth where something called Direct Democracy actually exists in practice. Direct Democracy is the purest form of Democracy unlike Representative Democracy — which is what we have in Britain — Parliament, Government, etc. In Direct Democracy people directly decide all the major issues through public referendums. But even in Switzerland — it is not everywhere, but only in two provinces — the Swiss cantons of Appenzell Innerrhoden and Glarus.
> So Switzerland as a country is considered a country of Semi Direct Democracy with strong elements of Direct Democracy.
> But you have to bear in mind, that it is very hard to organize Direct Democracy in bigger countries, Switzerland is tiny — only 8 million people live there- less than in London or in Moscow. Can you imagine — organizing several referendums a year? I can't. Number one — to organize a proper Referendum — you need time, so that opposing sides can have proper campaigns trying to win a public vote.
quoted1
I agree. But as times go by, new technologies make the process of organizing referendums easier. May be one day it will be possible for big countries to apply Direct Democracy.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
11:53 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> I agree. But as times go by, new technologies make the process of organizing referendums easier. May be one day it will be possible for big countries to apply Direct Democracy.
quoted1
>

It is not a matter of technology. There are electronic voting systems in place already (and those can be hacked, there can be computer errors, etc) and all that. Here they use them more in public polls, but not in important things like General elections, crucial Referendums,, etc. Here they still use pencils. But that doesn't mean that the results on ballot papers can be easily altered and messed with They are special pencils, that can't be erased. The reason they do not use pens here is not because it is more expensive, but because in the old days during the rainy weather the ink from pens could disappear. So they started using special pencils — they withstand water. It is the same in the Republic of Ireland. Here there has been a lot of talk about electronic voting, etc. But everyone trusts the current system more. With pencils.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
12:00 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> I bet the West wouldn't recognize it anyway. As for me, western officials have double (or triple) standards when they deal with different countries.
> And they don't bother themselves to act in full accordance with international laws when they deal with «3rd world countries». Ukrainian statehood suffered a lot at Maidan. Probably, Putin decided to act like that (green men, etc) after he saw that Ukrainian opposition backed by western leaders used Ukrainian constitution as a toilet paper.
quoted1
With Crimea — it is a very controversial case. Because it alters post World War borders. But then again — Yugoslavia was broken up, Czechoslovakia, etc. But that was either by mutual agreement (Czechoslovakia) or a prolonged bloody war (Yugoslavia). Crimea was just a case of a quick annexation. However, cause of Sevastopol and the Russian Naval Base there one could argue that Crimea has never been properly Ukrainian anyway, it has always been half Russian. So it is hard really — with Crimea. One could argue that it is a very special and unique case. And I think that despite the rhetoric, if Putin stopped there and didn't stir up a conflict in Donbass, the West would have not properly recognized it, but it would have been more or less OK with it. The sanctions after Crimea were very mild, virtually non existent. But we don't know for sure — it is all ifs and buts and maybes.

I got to go now, nice talking to you — as always. .)
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
12:51 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> I got to go now, nice talking to you — as always. .)
quoted1
Have a nice day
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
13:50 28.02.2019
http://twitter.com/sharijnet/status/11010649996...

Can't wait to see Goncharenko doing the same






Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER),
What do you think about it?
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
16:17 28.02.2019
Some good news about Brexit

Brexit latest news: World's largest sovereign wealth fund boosts investment in UK


The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund has said it will expand its investment in Britain as it claimed confidence in the country remains undiminished by Brexit.

OSLO (Reuters) — Norway’s $ 1 trillion (£753 billion) sovereign wealth fund, the world’s biggest, said on Wednesday it planned to keep increasing its investments in Britain, and it shrugged off uncertainties about Brexit.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/02/28/...
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
17:17 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Brexit latest news: World's largest sovereign wealth fund boosts investment in UK
quoted1


Btw, how many British 'vatniks' are there in Britain?)
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
22:23 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
>> Brexit latest news: World's largest sovereign wealth fund boosts investment in UK
quoted2
>
>
> Btw, how many British 'vatniks' are there in Britain?)
quoted1

It depends on what your definition of a «vatnik» is. If it is a person who praises the authorities regardless — then probably none. Here everyone is very critical of the authorities and suspicious of any politicians.
Also, over here someone from Germany can say something like «Something is better in Germany than in England — for example the food is cheaper, the healthcare is more advanced «- whatever, the answer from someone English would be «Oh, you lucky folk. Our NHS has been going down the drain recently, it needs improvement». No offence would be taken.
If a «vatnik» is someone who is just proud to be a Brit — then probably most people here are vatniks.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
23:17 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

> It depends on what your definition of a «vatnik» is. If it is a person who praises the authorities regardless — then probably none. Here everyone is very critical of the authorities and suspicious of any politicians.
> Also, over here someone from Germany can say something like «Something is better in Germany than in England — for example the food is cheaper, the healthcare is more advanced «- whatever, the answer from someone English would be «Oh, you lucky folk. Our NHS has been going down the drain recently, it needs improvement». No offence would be taken.
> If a «vatnik» is someone who is just proud to be a Brit — then probably most people here are vatniks.
quoted1
You were mentioning British vatniks in your posts about Brexit, so it's up to you.
But If you ask my opinion, I'd call British vatniks people who are for hard Brexit («no deal») even if they know it will make their life harder.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
23:24 28.02.2019
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
23:27 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

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quoted1

Well, I thought you meant generally, If in the context of Brexit, then it is complicated. Those for a No Deal and Hard Brexit do not necessarily think that it will make their life harder. Someone like Rees Mogg thinks that it will make life easier quite quickly. Cause his idea is we will walk away from the high tariffs of the EU (the EU is a protectionist block in their trading with other countries) and make our economy a low tariff economy — like Singapore. So exports from other countries will flood the UK, there will be lots of competition and the prices will go down as a result (he was explaining all that in his BBC interview I posted above). On top of that — people like him think that we will slash CT (Corporation TAx) and other taxes, which will bring a lot of businesses and investment into the UK. So he doesn't think it will make our life harder. And then there are those Brexiteers who want a deal with the EU, but are convinced that the only way to achieve that — is to trigger off a NO Deal scenario — in which case the EU will come to us themselves, cause the UK has a trade deficit with the EU of £190 billion per year (they export more to us, then we do to them), so they will be adversely affected quite a lot in the NO Deal scenario and will have no choice but to be more amenable. Hardly any of them can be called «vatniks». Or can they? I am not so sure.
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  Grin
25771


Messages: 7073
23:45 28.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
>> ou were mentioning British vatniks in your posts about Brexit, so its up to you. But If you ask my opinion, I'd call British vatniks people who are for hard Brexit (or even «no deal») even if they know it will make their life harder.
quoted2
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>>
quoted2
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> Well, I thought you meant generally, If in the context of Brexit, then it is complicated. Those for a No Deal and Hard Brexit do not necessarily think that it will make their life harder. Someone like Rees Mogg thinks that it will make life easier quite quickly. Cause his idea is we will walk away from the high tariffs of the EU (the EU is a protectionist block in their trading with other countries) and make our economy a low tariff economy — like Singapore. So exports from other countries will flood the UK, there will be lots of competition and the prices will go down as a result (he was explaining all that in his BBC interview I posted above). On top of that — people like him think that we will slash CT (Corporation TAx) and other taxes, which will bring a lot of businesses and investment into the UK. So he doesn't think it will make our life harder. And then there are those Brexiteers who want a deal with the EU, but are convinced that the only way to achieve that — is to trigger off a NO Deal scenario — in which case the EU will come to us themselves, cause the UK has a trade deficit with the EU of £190 billion per year (they export more to us, then we do to them), so they will be adversely affected quite a lot in the NO Deal scenario and will have no choice but to be more amenable. Hardly any of them can be called «vatniks». Or can they? I am not so sure.
quoted1
Ok. But how many of those Brexiteers agree for no deal or smth like that even if it makes their life harder. How many of them want to leave not because of economical reasons but because they think EU wants to steal their identity (for example)
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 16334
23:51 28.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

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quoted1
Well, most Brexiteers and even Remainers agree that the EU has moved too fast in terms of expansionism and is destroying the nation state democracy. I doubt that there is any Brit out there who wants to wave the EU flag instead of the British one. But those from the Brexiteer gang are quite clever and they have plans, so to speak, they are not just starry eyed fools, this is what I meant.
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