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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
11:32 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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quoted1
I also heard something along the lines that Ukraine exports more to the EU than to Russia now. But Grin was writing about the overall trade turnover, maybe Russian exports into Ukraine have grown? In any case, the increase in trade with Russia is also good news. Any increase in trade brings prosperity. The UK doesn't like the EU, but we are still trying very hard to strike a trade deal with them.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
11:44 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> That term came from the first Soviet famine in the 20s and Russians really remember that one. It was even shown in literature ('Ташкент — город хлебный'). But there is nothing in Russian culture about the famine of the 32−33 years.
quoted1

As it happens, they do not remember that it was the American Famine Relief programme in the 1920s that saved some 20 million lives from starvation there, despite the fact that the American Government never recognized the new Soviet Regime. And the Soviet Regime was very grateful to the Americans at the time for their generosity. Their today's propaganda is working to get them to hate the West — the US and Britain especially and they are not properly educated in that sense at all. But their propagandists themselves school their kids in the West, buy property here and keep their money here.
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> I didn't say that it is not, but it is deep in your own way. And it grew more from 'slavophilia': just check out monologues of the 'Prince Christ' Myshkin in Dostoyevskiy's 'Idiot' about Russian 'mission', Orthodoxy and Catholics. You want to make some 'third way' in everything, and Ukrainian culture leans to the already known European way. It was before Russian rule, it was proclaimed in our 20-s and it is a trend again.
quoted1

The truth is there is no «third way», it doesn't exist. They try to copy Western culture — in music, art, everything. They use western technology every day and model themselves on the West. They are in denial about it though. «Third way» is their propagandistic crap.

Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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That is why they seem to be so hateful towards Britain — it is jealousy and envy. Britain pioneered the way for modern living. Everything first happened in Britain — first Parliament, first industrial revolution, first modernisation, first successful colonisation. The countries colonised by Britain — most of them — are today's first world countries. The Russian Empire collapsed «thanks» to communists, and the Soviet Union left behind a bunch of poor countries, laden with corruption. Their answer is to hate more successful countries and blame them for anything wrong that happened to them. It is a very wrong attitude to have of course and it is bad for themselves in the first place, not for anyone else. But such is their propaganda of today, it will change in due course, it always does.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
11:49 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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> I will be very glad if you tell me your thoughts about this!
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> P.S.: I suppose that I have made a lot of grammar mistakes by this moment. I am very sorry for it. It's because I have something like a head ache now. Don't draw to much attention to it if you can.
quoted1

Forget about grammar mistakes. The drawing is beautiful. But I have no idea about the subject of the book, the Age of Innocence by Wanton. What is that about? So can't really comment whether your cover design is suitable in that sense, whether it reflects the contents and in what way. Sorry. All I can say is — it is nice.
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
14:30 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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quoted2
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>> I will be very glad if you tell me your thoughts about this!
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>> <nobr>P. S.</nobr>: I suppose that I have made a lot of grammar mistakes by this moment. I am very sorry for it. It's because I have something like a head ache now. Don't draw to much attention to it if you can.
quoted2
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> Forget about grammar mistakes. The drawing is beautiful. But I have no idea about the subject of the book, the Age of Innocence by Wanton. What is that about? So can't really comment whether your cover design is suitable in that sense, whether it reflects the contents and in what way. Sorry. All I can say is — it is nice.
quoted1
I don't either. I just want to make something nice for the frontispiece and that's all. Thanks for the answer

<nobr>P. S.</nobr>: 'The Age of Innocence' by Edith Wharton is a Pulitzer prize winner book about live of noble New-Yorkers in the late 19th century, though I haven't read it yet.
Liked: Redhead
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
14:40 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> I also heard something along the lines that Ukraine exports more to the EU than to Russia now. But Grin was writing about the overall trade turnover, maybe Russian exports into Ukraine have grown? In any case, the increase in trade with Russia is also good news. Any increase in trade brings prosperity. The UK doesn't like the EU, but we are still trying very hard to strike a trade deal with them.
quoted1
Some Ukrainians are resentful with it though. They reckon that we have war with Russia and trading will hence give them ability to convert profits of it into the weapons for killing our soldiers and supporting our fifth column what is quite understandable.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
16:11 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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quoted1
It is understandable of course. And there is a war with Russia going on in Donbass, of course. Although from what I can gather — it has died down a lot recently. You could argue that on the other hand, if you make money from trading with Russia — then you also have the ability to convert the profits from that into the weapons for killing their soldiers. But of course — that is a very cold hearted way of looking at it, if not completely callous.

Putin doesn't want Donbass, what he wants is pro Russian Donbass inside Ukraine. So that the Russian agenda is taken into account by the Ukrainian authorities on a governmental level. The problem with that strategy is this — the war itself alienates the local population from Russia. From what I heard — the locals are not taking part in fighting there at all, it is mostly Russian mercenaries and local criminal elements. The population is leaving either for the other parts of Ukraine or for Russia. And the local population of the areas affected by this conflict loses the sympathy for the Russian cause in the process. Cause the so called «Russky Mir» brought them war, poverty, destruction and lost them their homes. This strategy didn't bring the desired result in Georgia or Moldova for instance. It had the opposite effect on the rest of their countries and their governments.
However. The world doesn't stand still. There is a certain «perestroika» if you like — going on now in the EU (Brexit, etc.) and in the US. At the same time — «the Crimea nash» euphoria is kind of subsiding in Russia. They do feel the adverse effects caused by western sanctions and their economy is stagnating. They do realize that Putin has bitten off a bit more than he can chew. At some point their authorities will change their current confrontational course — if not for a completely pro Western one, but for a more Western friendly one. At that point it will make a lot of sense to actually federalize Ukraine and be an «in- betweener» — rather than siding with the beleaguered EU completely or completely with Russia, you could benefit from trading with both and be a bridge between the two. It could prove a very profitable and prosperous situation for Ukraine to find itself in.
This is what the UK is trying to do. We have never been fully in the EU. And now we want to leave, but with a trade deal. At the same time — if we leave, we can sign our own trade deals — with Australia, Canada, the US. Trump said yesterday he cannot wait for Brexit to happen, as wants to massively strengthen the UK — US trading relations as a priority and he is coming for a visit to discuss this in November — October this year, by which time he thinks the Brexit palaver will be over and done with. But the EU is not being cooperative at all, as needs the UK fully on board financially. So at the moment it is all a bit of a mess. But my point is you could be like the UK (being the bridge between the US and the EU) — you could be the bridge between Russia and the EU.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
16:40 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> However. The world doesn't stand still. There is a certain «perestroika» if you like — going on now in the EU (Brexit, etc.) and in the US. At the same time — «the Crimea nash» euphoria is kind of subsiding in Russia. They do feel the adverse effects caused by western sanctions and their economy is stagnating. They do realize that Putin has bitten off a bit more than he can chew. At some point their authorities will change their current confrontational course — if not for a completely pro Western one, but for a more Western friendly one. At that point it will make a lot of sense to actually federalize Ukraine and be an «in- betweener» — rather than siding with the beleaguered EU completely or completely with Russia, you could benefit from trading with both and be a bridge between the two. It could prove a very profitable and prosperous situation for Ukraine to find itself in.
quoted1

P. S. Actually, if that happens — if Russia changes its course for a more pro Western one - the need for federalization might not even be there anymore. But you will have to make sure that the rights of the Russian speaking population are protected and drop the unfriendly rhetoric, etc.

Also — we don't know what is gonna happen with the EU yet. I think it is on the decline and if Britain leaves without a deal, it will be f***d. In any case, the golden days for the EU project are over. So don't put all your eggs in one basket.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
16:54 16.02.2019
Trump announces huge trade boost between the US and the UK post Brexit

Brexit latest news: Donald Trump says Brexit will 'very substantially' boost UK-US trade

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/02/15/...

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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
18:31 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat), In my opinion, nobody really wants Donbass now. Unfortunately. Your views maybe would have worked if Donbass was open society now with freedom of speech and democratic traditions, but it never was and it is not still. Even in the controlled by Kiev part of Donbass about half of population think that it war began because of Ukrainian actions (course towards EU or abolishing Kivalov-Kolesnichenko's language law) but not because of Russian clowns (talking about 'cossacks'), mercenaries and fanatics supplied with guns and tanks. They even supported ex-regionals on the elections after all they have done during Maidan! And just imagine what people in occupied areas think being under the press of Russian propaganda. If they oppose somebody, it will be only local Gauleiter but not Russia. They want peace and prosperity, but not under 'nationalists' regime.

That's why Kiev is not enthusiastic about bringing these lands back, not counting that this areas became wasteland during the war. And Russia doesn't want to take them in, because it is the perfect way to blackmail Kiev and make their own conditions and, again, it will eat the whole Russian budget to rebuild this region.

And don't be deceived by the Russian propaganda. There is no oppression of Russian language or Russian speaking population. I live in Odessa where the most people speak Russian language and there is nothing that may be considered as discrimination. Even the mayor speaks Russian during various events! Everybody has right to speak that language that they prefer.

'Federalisation' is like 'oppression of the Russians in Ukraine'. Russian TV and Russian puppets talk about them only. Firstly, there is no need in it. For example, the US are federated because they were made of some very different 13 colonies; Switzerland was made of some completely different lands, where lived for a very long time the French, the Germans and the Italians; Belgium is made, too, of 2 very different parts called Wallonia and Flandria. There is anything in Ukraine like that.

And secondly, there will be no use in it for the people. It will just divide country for oligarchy to give it even more power in their 'counties'. And the Ukrainian speaking population will be greatly oppressed after it, like Belarussian speakers in Belarus or Irish in the Ireland, thus destroying Ukrainian community and culture there. Even now some newspapers don't take articles written in Ukrainian, and what will be with the Russian like 'second official'?
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
18:34 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat), Also, can you tell if the UK is a federation? What rights do Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have, what can they decide, do they have more sovereignty than the American states or less etc? In Ukrainian geographical maps cartographers don't reckon that the UK is federation.
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  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
18:44 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> As it happens, they do not remember that it was the American Famine Relief programme in the 1920s that saved some 20 million lives from starvation there, despite the fact that the American Government never recognized the new Soviet Regime.
quoted1
Not even Russians. The South of Ukraine was affected by famine too (because of 'продразверстки') and thanks to the Nansen's mission (not American though, but Western) the casualties didn't became so horrible like it would be in the 30s.
> The truth is there is no «third way», it doesn't exist. They try to copy Western culture — in music, art, everything. They use western technology every day and model themselves on the West. They are in denial about it though. «Third way» is their propagandistic crap.
quoted1
My point is that Russians oppose the West, but our cultural elite has never been in opposition against West. In practice Russian culture doesn't make alliances with other cultures but consumes them. Just ask, for example, your friends if they know what is Ukraine. I suppose that they will say immediately that we are Russia. In my opinion, being with Europe will make Ukraine equal culturally with other European nations, but being with Russia will make Ukraine just a resource base and integral part of the Russian culture, like it was with Hohol, Riepin, Korolenko, Malevich and others.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
22:07 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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The UK is even more than a federation. It is like a collection of separate states. In the UK there happened a process called devolution

Devolution is the statutory delegation of powers from the central government of a sovereign state to govern at a subnational level, such as a regional or local level. It is a form of administrative decentralization. Devolved territories have the power to make legislation relevant to the area.

Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland — apart from having representation in Westminster — all have their own Parliaments. Scotland is more devolved than others. They set their own laws, etc. For example, they don't pay for university education or elderly care. To be honest, a lot in England would actually not mind at all if Scotland left, cause they exist at the expense of the English taxpayer. But they will never leave. Even during the referendum campaign, they said they wanted to keep the pound sterling and Queen as Head of STate. If they left, they couldn't afford the life they are leading now at all. And the SNP (Scottish National Party) — they position themselves not just as nationalists, but also as a socialist party — in order to oppose Labour in Scotland. They use the independence argument to keep blackmailing England for more money, that's all, they have no intention of leaving. Now a lot in England are saying that they don't mind letting go of Northern Ireland at all — cause they want to leave the EU and do not want to get involved in the Irish sectarianism. There are only 1.8 million in Northern Ireland, 6 million in Scotland and 60 million in England, there are 12 million in Greater London alone. All the wealth and the economy is here, in England. Also, if any of them were to leave, no material change would happen. They are already like separate states. England even has its own national football team, there is no UK football team you know. Only foreign policy is the same, flag, Queen, currency, etc. But these are the things they all want to keep anyway. Some argue that there is oil in Scotland, but all the oil there belongs to British Petroleum anyway, so makes no difference — zilch. BP is a multinational giant, where not just the Scots, but people from all over the world have jobs and they pay taxes to the UK Chancellor of the Exchequer.

There is a thing called the Barnet formula, according to which Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland receive a lion share of funding from England. Failing that, they would be in poverty.

In the UK even borough local authorities are completely devolved from the Central Government, they raise their own taxes and have their own budgets and policies, according to which party has the majority in the local authority.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
22:22 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> My point is that Russians oppose the West, but our cultural elite has never been in opposition against West.
quoted1

Their elite is hardly in opposition to the West — they buy property here, have foreign bank accounts and citizenships (well, most of their kids and relatives do). They just feed anti western propaganda to people at large there, so that they see the West as their enemy number one and not the corrupt regime.
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
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I hear you. I get your point, but please bear in mind — that talent has no borders. There are lots of talented Russians working abroad and that doesn't make them less Russian. So likewise, those Ukrainians who might realize their potential in Russia — do not become less Ukrainian because of that or less talented.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
22:31 16.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> being with Europe will make Ukraine equal culturally with other European nations
quoted1

You are already in Europe. Being a European does not mean you have to be in the EU. Norway isn't for instance, are they not European? Being European does not equal having the EU membership. Germany has plans for Turkey to get the full EU membership. Will that make Turkish Europeans ? I don't think so. We are leaving the EU, but we are not gonna be less European because of that.
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  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
23:25 16.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> There is a thing called the Barnet formula, according to which Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland receive a lion share of funding from England. Failing that, they would be in poverty.
quoted1

Explanation about the Barnet Formula

The Barnet forumula



The Barnett formula is a mechanism used by the Treasury in the United Kingdom to automatically adjust the amounts of public expenditure allocated to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales to reflect changes in spending levels allocated to public services in England, England and Wales or Great Britain, as appropriate. The formula applies to a large proportion, but not the whole, of the devolved governments' budgets − in 2013−14 it applied to about 85% of the Scottish Parliament's total budget.
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Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2. I also heard something along the lines that Ukraine exports more to the EU than to Russia ...
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