Political Forum. Opinions and Debates.

Log in | Registration
Go to the first message← Previous page
Next page →Go to the last message

Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2

  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
10:44 14.02.2019
Oleksa Єromіn (WILDTRACER) wrote in reply to post:
> I suppose that our economic relations will remain on the bottom for a longer time
quoted1
As far as I remember the trade turnover between Russia and Ukraine rose by more than 20% in 2018
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
15:48 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> How can people then go on forums and write stupid hateful things like «англичанка гадит» or let's bomb London, etc. They must be really poorly educated
quoted1
Well, can you remind me of some positive/friendly moves towards Russia from the UK during last 20 years?

I can only remember that Britain abstained when US and Canada voted for raising the minimum eligibility age for senior figure skaters . It was a nice surprise for me.

I assume there were some other positive moments, I just can't remember them
Link Complain Quote  
  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
16:06 14.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Well, can you remind me of some positive/friendly moves towards Russia from the UK during last 20 years?
>
quoted1

Our Queen invited your Putin for a state visit. This is a massive honour for any President. For example, in the States they judge as to how important their President's standing in the world is by when the Queen invited them. For example, Trump kind of invited himself for a visit, but the Queen hasn't invited him yet.









And what friendly moves did you pay back with? Sending your cronies to leave traces of polonium all over the centre of London and Novichok poison all over the place? Friendly moves, how very dare you even talk like that after what your authorities did in Salisbury?
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
16:19 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Our Queen invited your Putin for a state visit. This is a massive honour for any President.
quoted1
Thanks I completely forgot about it

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> And what friendly moves did you pay back with?
quoted1
Maybe this one. Probably, not as massive as a Putin's visit to the UK, but still a friendly move
https://www.theatlantic.com/news/archive/2016/09...

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> Sending your cronies to leave traces of polonium all over the centre of London and Novichok poison all over the place? Friendly moves, how very dare you even talk like that after what your authorities did in Salisbury?
quoted1
It's debatable
Link Complain Quote  
  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
17:03 14.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Thanks I completely forgot about it
>
quoted1

The Russians these days forget any good things that come from the West and only remember bad stuff. You perceive yourself as the victims and hard done by. You forget that you had so much help from both the Brits and the Americans throughout the whole of last century — during the 1920s, the World War 2 and the Perestroyka. Here people remember good things about the Russians. Do you remember any of this for example?

he Arctic convoys of World War II were oceangoing convoys which sailed from the United Kingdom, Iceland, and North America to northern ports in the Soviet Union — primarily Arkhangelsk (Archangel) and Murmansk in Russia. There were 78 convoys between August 1941 and May 1945,[1] sailing via several seas of the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, with two gaps with no sailings between July and September 1942, and March and November 1943.

About 1,400 merchant ships delivered essential supplies to the Soviet Union under the Lend-Lease program, escorted by ships of the Royal Navy, Royal Canadian Navy, and the U.S. Navy. Eighty-five merchant vessels and 16 Royal Navy warships (two cruisers, six destroyers, eight other escort ships) were lost. Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine lost a number of vessels including one battleship, three destroyers and at least 30 U-boats, and many aircraft. The convoys demonstrated the Allies' commitment to helping the Soviet Union, prior to the opening of a second front, and tied up a substantial part of Germany's naval and air forces.[2]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_convoys_of_...
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> It's debatable
>
quoted1

You know — here everyone believes of course our Government's version of events, which is understandable. But regardless of that — noone blames the people in Russia. The Russian forum users come up with offensive stuff about the so called «anglo saxons» all the time.

P.S,. It is all right to demonize any authorities - May, Putin, Trump or whoever . It is not all right to demonize the entire nations - be it the Brits, the Americans, the Ukrainians or the Russians. You in Russia do quite a lot of that to others, whilst constantly complaining about Russophobia. Fact.
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
17:25 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> The Russians these days forget any good things that come from the West and only remember bad stuff. You perceive yourself as the victims and hard done by. You forget that you had so much help from both the Brits and the Americans throughout the whole of last century — during the 1920s, the World War 2 and the Perestroyka. Here people remember good things about the Russians. Do you remember any of this for example?
quoted1
People tend to remember bad things more than good things.

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> during the 1920s
quoted1
Do you mean British soldiers on our soil? We see it as intervention.

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> he Arctic convoys of World War II were oceangoing convoys which sailed from the United Kingdom, Iceland, and North America to northern ports in the Soviet Union — primarily Arkhangelsk (Archangel) and Murmansk in Russia. There were 78 convoys between August 1941 and May 1945,[1] sailing via several seas of the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, with two gaps with no sailings between July and September 1942, and March and November 1943
quoted1
Excuse me, but that was kinda trade, not help. But It saved many many lives. I give you that.

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> and the Perestroyka
quoted1
I wish it never happened. China learned a lot from our mistakes. They are doing much better on their way to market economy than we did.
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
17:30 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> P.S,. It is all right to demonize any authorities — May, Putin, Trump or whoever. It is not all right to demonize the entire nations — be it the Brits, the Americans, the Ukrainians or the Russians. You in Russia do quite a lot of that to others, whilst constantly complaining about Russophobia. Fact.
quoted1
Can't agree more - it is not all right to demonize the entire nations (say hello to Ukrainian media).
But we have a basis for complaining about Russophobia.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/04/opinion/the-p...
«Corruption is in Russia’s DNA» — wft? Imagine NYT wrote «Corruption is in Jewish DNA».
I can give you more examples if you like.
Link Complain Quote  
  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
17:39 14.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> People tend to remember bad things more than good things.
>
quoted1
Is that your idea of a suitable excuse?
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Do you mean British soldiers on our soil? We see it as intervention.
quoted1
>

I had no idea that the British soldiers were on your soil during that time, what I meant was this

EARLY COOPERATION: AMERICAN FAMINE RELIEF


https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/archives/eara.html
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> Excuse me, but that was kinda trade, not help. But It saved many many lives. I give you that.
quoted1
>

What do you mean — kinda trade? Do you have any idea how many British and American lives perished during those convoys? The convoys were aerial bombed by the Nazis, etc.
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> I wish it never happened.
quoted1

You can't always blame the West for your own mistakes.
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

> https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/04/opinion/the-p...
> "Corruption is in Russia’s DNA" — wft? Imagine NYT wrote «Corruption is in Jewish DNA».
> I can give you more examples if you like.
quoted1

That is just one nasty article. And it is mostly about Putin, not all the Russians.

P. S. I got to go now.
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
17:42 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> What do you mean — kinda trade? Do you have any idea how many British and American lives perished during those convoys? The convoys were aerial bombed by the Nazis, etc.
quoted1
I mean that USSR was paying for it. When you pay for smth it is called trade. But I don't deny it helped to save many lives. I also don't deny the heroism of the people who did it despite being bombed by the Nazis.
Link Complain Quote  
  Grin
25771


Messages: 7415
17:45 14.02.2019
Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> That is just one nasty article.
quoted1
The problem is there are many articles like that. And overall western media hysteria about «the Russians did it» isn't healthy

Redhead (Expat) wrote in reply to post:
> P. S. I got to go now.
quoted1
See you
Link Complain Quote  
  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
17:05 15.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
Expand message beginning

>
>
>
quoted1

Yeah, the operation re those convoys was very hard. If you read some Russian forum users, you get the impression they don't realize what was involved, they just think that the Americans gave them some money that they had to pay back later. It wasn't quite as simple as that. This is what was involved in it — these operations were huge and extremely risky and in extreme weather conditions. Here they still show war time documentaries about them.

Convoy organisation
Ice forms on a 20-inch signal projector on the cruiser HMS Sheffield while she is helping to escort an Arctic convoy to Russia.
The Arctic convoys ran in two series, following the first convoy, code-named Operation Dervish.[3]
The first series, PQ (outbound) and QP (homebound), ran from September 1941 to September 1942. These convoys ran twice monthly, but were interrupted in the summer of 1942 when the series was suspended after the disaster of Convoy PQ 17 and again in the autumn after the final convoy of the series, Convoy PQ 18, due to lengthening daylight hours and the preparations for Operation Torch.
The second series of convoys, JW (outbound) and RA (homebound) ran from December 1942 until the end of the war, though with interruptions in the summer of 1943 and again in the summer of 1944.
The convoys ran from Iceland (usually off Hvalfjörður) north of Jan Mayen Island to Arkhangelsk when the ice permitted in the summer months, shifting south as the pack ice increased and terminating at Murmansk. From February1942 they assembled and sailed from Loch Ewe in Scotland.[4]
Outbound and homebound convoys were planned to run simultaneously; a close escort accompanied the merchant ships to port, remaining to make the subsequent return trip, whilst a covering force of heavy surface units was also provided to guard against sorties by ships, such as Tirpitz. These would accompany the outbound convoy to a cross-over point, meeting and then conducting the homebound convoy back, while the close escort finished the voyage with its charges.
The route was around occupied Norway to the Soviet ports, and was particularly dangerous due to the proximity of German air, submarine and surface forces, and also because of the likelihood of severe weather, the frequency of fog, the strong currents and the mixing of cold and warm waters which made ASDIC use difficult, drift ice and the alternation between the difficulties of navigating and maintaining convoy cohesion in constant darkness in winter convoys or being attacked around-the-clock in constant daylight in summer convoys.


Funnily enough, look at the wartime British poster about those convoys — it doesn't say the USSR on it, it says Russia.






P.S. Also - the Brits were helped by the Americans as well during the war and also had to pay it back. It is capitalism, nothing against Russia. The US Government just had to pay back the arms producers , the food producers, for oil, etc. - it couldn't be helped:


The Lend-Lease policy, formally titled An Act to Promote the Defense of the United States, was an American program to defeat Germany, Japan and Italy by distributing food, oil, and materiel between 1941 and August 1945. The aid went to the United Kingdom, China, and later the Soviet Union, Free France, and other Allied nations
Link Complain Quote  
  Redhead
Expat


Messages: 17299
17:08 15.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> See you
quoted1

I passed what I thought was my last exam today before starting a new job on Monday and today I found out there is one more short course to do re the new derivatives regulation. I am fed up with all this to be honest, missing work. But my role will be with a lot more responsibility and my authorisation limits will be very different, so it all has to be gone through. I am scared to be honest — to take on so much more responsibility. And I probably won't be able to book any holidays in the near future. I already have some booked — but fortunately later in the year.
Link Complain Quote  
  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
23:43 15.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> As far as I remember the trade turnover between Russia and Ukraine rose by more than 20% in 2018
>
quoted1
I do not know about the quantity of goods sold, but it was told that trade ratio between Ukraine and Russia and EU became less and more respectively. I mean that Ukraine's export in EU grows faster than in Russia. Something like that. If you want I can try to seek the exact data.
Link Complain Quote  
  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
00:11 16.02.2019
Grin (25771) wrote in reply to post:
> There was also a famine in Kazakhstan. Well, the term «голодающий Поволжья» is well-know to anyone in Russia.
quoted1
That term came from the first Soviet famine in the 20s and Russians really remember that one. It was even shown in literature ('Ташкент — город хлебный'). But there is nothing in Russian culture about the famine of the 32−33 years.
> And to be honest, since 1992 Ukraine elites where trying to dig out as many negative facts about relations between Russia and Ukraine as possible.
quoted1
It may be told about Ukrainian nationalists, but I cannot say anything about our pre-Yushchenko elites.
> It is also well-known that quite often Ukrainian Institute of National Remembrance is trying to rewrite history in favour of current political agenda instead of restoration of objective and fair history of the Ukrainian people.
quoted1
I don't know anything about 'rewriting' history. Our Institute tries to dig more information about black holes in our history (Revolution, Bandera movement etc) and supports the Ukrainian point of view about history. For example they sponsored historical movie 'Kruty 1918'. The only, and very huge one, problem I see that they disdain Soviet part of the Ukrainian history. We cannot make at the moment our whole vista of the history.
> What? Russian culture is deep and rich.
quoted1
I didn't say that it is not, but it is deep in your own way. And it grew more from 'slavophilia': just check out monologues of the 'Prince Christ' Myshkin in Dostoyevskiy's 'Idiot' about Russian 'mission', Orthodoxy and Catholics. You want to make some 'third way' in everything, and Ukrainian culture leans to the already known European way. It was before Russian rule, it was proclaimed in our 20-s and it is a trend again.
> The British Empire accounted for 13.6% of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 1913, while Russia’s accounted for 8.3%.
quoted1
The economy of the British Empire was made of the GB economy and the British Raj economy, and the GB itself made the same GDP as Russia. Just imagine, some small island with not so big population (about 40 millions) had the same GDP as the second biggest empire in the world with 150 million population.
Link Complain Quote  
  Oleksa Єromіn
WILDTRACER


Messages: 12310
00:21 16.02.2019
Guys, may I ask your opinion? I am working on a frontispiece of a book (Wharton's 'Age of Innocence', if you are interested) and don't know if my projects for it look nice. Could you tell: what do you think about this pattern in general; what would you change there; what could you propose to do with it. Don't give attention to text, it is not the final pattern (title will be written with Spencerian and author's name and city with New-Yorker website script). Lines won't be seen, all pattern is going to be in one shade of red.



I will be very glad if you tell me your thoughts about this!

P.S.: I suppose that I have made a lot of grammar mistakes by this moment. I am very sorry for it. It's because I have something like a head ache now. Don't draw to much attention to it if you can.
Liked: Redhead
Link Complain Quote  
Go to the first message← Previous page
Next page →Go to the last message

Return to the list of threads


Username
Thread:
B I U S cite spoiler
Message:(0/500)
More Emoticons
        
Forums
Main discussion
En/Ru discussion new
Russian forum
Users online
Translate the page
Figure skating, ballet, music etc 2. As far as I remember the trade turnover between Russia and Ukraine rose by more than 20% in 2018
.
© PolitForums.net 2019 | Our e-mail:
Mobile version